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How do SARMs work?

Selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs, are a type of androgen receptor molecule that binds to a central metal atom to form a coordination complex, or ion surrounded by other molecules.  In other words, SARMs are chemical massagers that will influence the levels of hormones in the body, similar to what anabolic steroids do. Binding to and modulating hormones and hormone producing receptors in the body will influence the body’s ability to regulate androgen production.  SARMs aren’t yet approved for medical use beyond research and development so most don’t have actual names, but abbreviations for their chemical makeup.

Presumably Safer than Steroids

Less Addictive

SARMs have long been assumed to be safer than steroids but we’re fast approaching the area of certainty.  As more and more studies are published proving that steroid use comes with risk of addiction, there are yet to be any concrete findings that test subjects form a dependence on SARMs.  One particular study suggests that 30% of all steroid users form a dependence too strong to kick without suffering though uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.

More recent studies have shown the important roles that SARMs play in the physiology and pathology of diverse tissues.  Long story short, muscle tissue can be influenced to grow without the addiction hazard that can be caused by anabolic steroid use.

Liver and Kidney Preservation

When subjected to anabolic steroids, especially over a prolonged period of time, the liver and kidneys in humans and animals alike tend to be damaged from the constant work that’s asked of them.  Like it or not we have years of abuse cases to derive this from.  Athletes from all around the world have been using anabolic steroids for years.  Many of them end up with liver or kidney failure.

SARMs do not appear to have any effect on the kidneys and liver.  In fact, if anything, SARMs have been found to be therapeutic for both muscle tissue and internal organs such as the kidneys and liver!

So What Makes SARMs Tick?

Being honest, when it comes to the androgens, steroids and SARMs aren’t that different.  The hormones that effect just how masculine a person is are the same, regardless of modulator.  With SARMs however, the androgens can exert their effects on the body in a few key ways. First and foremost, the SARM will bind to cellular androgen receptors.  Secondly, it can convert to a hormone called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT.  The third and final way; it can convert to the hormone estradiol, which will bind to a different type of receptor that the others.  All of these result in increased muscle growth and strength.

Selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs, are a type of androgen receptor molecule that binds to a central metal atom to form a coordination complex, or ion surrounded by other molecules.  In other words, SARMs are chemical massagers that will influence the levels of hormones in the body, similar to what anabolic steroids do. Binding to and modulating hormones and hormone producing receptors in the body will influence the body’s ability to regulate androgen production.  SARMs aren’t yet approved for medical use beyond research and development so most don’t have actual names, but abbreviations for their chemical makeup.

Presumably Safer than Steroids

Less Addictive

SARMs have long been assumed to be safer than steroids but we’re fast approaching the area of certainty.  As more and more studies are published proving that steroid use comes with risk of addiction, there are yet to be any concrete findings that test subjects form a dependence on SARMs.  One particular study suggests that 30% of all steroid users form a dependence too strong to kick without suffering though uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms.

More recent studies have shown the important roles that SARMs play in the physiology and pathology of diverse tissues.  Long story short, muscle tissue can be influenced to grow without the addiction hazard that can be caused by anabolic steroid use.

Liver and Kidney Preservation

When subjected to anabolic steroids, especially over a prolonged period of time, the liver and kidneys in humans and animals alike tend to be damaged from the constant work that’s asked of them.  Like it or not we have years of abuse cases to derive this from.  Athletes from all around the world have been using anabolic steroids for years.  Many of them end up with liver or kidney failure.

SARMs do not appear to have any effect on the kidneys and liver.  In fact, if anything, SARMs have been found to be therapeutic for both muscle tissue and internal organs such as the kidneys and liver!

So What Makes SARMs Tick?

Being honest, when it comes to the androgens, steroids and SARMs aren’t that different.  The hormones that effect just how masculine a person is are the same, regardless of modulator.  With SARMs however, the androgens can exert their effects on the body in a few key ways. First and foremost, the SARM will bind to cellular androgen receptors.  Secondly, it can convert to a hormone called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT.  The third and final way; it can convert to the hormone estradiol, which will bind to a different type of receptor that the others.  All of these result in increased muscle growth and strength.

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1.  Kanayama, G, et al. “Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: an Emerging Disorder.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19922565.

2. Narayanan, R, et al. “Development of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 15 Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28624515.

3. Sánchez-Osorio, M, et al. “Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids and Liver Injury.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17900246.

4. Gao, Wenging, and Dalton, James. “Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).” Drug Discovery Today., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Mar. 2007,  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2072879/.

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