What is Albuterol?

Newly for sale on gurupeptides.com, Albuterol!  Keeping in mind that our products are manufactured and distributed with the sole purpose of research and development in mind, the introductory price on USA made Albuterol is going to be tough to beat!  Like our other β2-adrenergic receptor agonists, Albuterol comes in small, 60ml vials and is 100% pure, suspended in Polyethylene glycol.

In an effort to provide our readers with the full disclosure that you’ve come to expect from gurupeptides.com, make sure you understand that albuterol may be marketed under a few different names.  Salbutamol and Ventolin are two of the most common alternatives, with the latter being a medication in which the albuterol is the active ingredient.

Albuterol Primary Use

There are almost 30 years of thorough studies regarding the efficacy of Albuterol when it comes to lung capacity and health improvements.  In 1992, a group from the Department of Pharmacy Practice from the University of Florida determined that inhaler delivered albuterol had undeniably beneficial lung effects.  All twelve participants in the study reported noticeable improvement in breathing capabilities.  The Albuterol opens up the larger pathways in the lungs to help treat individuals with asthma and bronchoconstriction.  

Bronchoconstriction?

Bronchoconstriction describes the constriction of airways that are connected to the lungs.  Sometimes people struggle to breath in when these airways are constricted, as you’d expect. Less common but arguably more alarming is the possibility that some people struggle to breathe out when these airways are constricted.  The result can be fatal but usually leads to uncontrollable coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and sometimes the breathing struggles can lead to muscle strains or pulls, particularly in the chest.

Treatments and doses can vary depending on the severity of the situation, but the most effective seems to be nebulizer treatment.  Albuterol can be used to free up the airways, much like in asthma patients, and allow the subject to breathe freely.

Alternate Use Cases

While the primary use is always going to be lung health improvement or asthma attack prevention, the medical community has determined there may be other uses for albuterol-based medications.  For instance, damage caused as a result of smoke inhalation. Lung capacity can be forever weakened after extended periods of smoke inhalation. A group of specialists from Shriners Hospitals for Children in Northern California and the University of California-Davis teamed up to explore the use of albuterol as a treatment method for individuals suffering from what was thought to be permanent lung or airway damage as a result of smoke inhalation.  They found that “continuous nebulization of albuterol improves pulmonary function via improved airway clearance and decreased fluid flux in a combined burn/smoke inhalation injury model.”  The Beta-2 agonist treatment could be a therapy method for people suffering from inhalation injuries!

Future Use Cases

Other similar research projects have been completed showing that albuterol is a beneficial beta-2 agonist for assisting in the lung healing process as a result of trauma.  Whether smoke inhalation, disease, virus, or infection, the hope is that albuterol can assist in the cure of lung damage and airway constriction.

1 Blake, K V, et al. “Relative Amount of Albuterol Delivered to Lung Receptors from a Metered-Dose Inhaler and Nebulizer Solution. Bioassay by Histamine Bronchoprovocation.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 1992, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1310456.

2 Spooner, L M, and J L Olin. “Paradoxical Bronchoconstriction with Albuterol Administered by Metered-Dose Inhaler and Nebulizer Solution.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Nov. 2005, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16174783.

3 Palmieri, T L, et al. “Continuous Nebulized Albuterol Attenuates Acute Lung Injury in an Ovine Model of Combined Burn and Smoke Inhalation.” Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16607229.

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